keep indoor plants happy
In: Landscape Tips0

Indoor plants breathe some life and color into your home, and they can be very refreshing during Minnesota’s harsh winters. But, indoor plants can be fickle and tricky to take care of. A dying, brown, and slumping plant is no way to get rid of some of those winter blues, so we’ve compiled a little guide to help keep your plants thriving.

Climate

Winters can make your house very dry. The base of the plant will get water from the soil, but the leaves often get left out. Outdoor plants get enough humidity by the rain and morning dew. So to mimic this effect inside, mist the leaves with a water bottle every couple of days. This will ensure they plant is getting the proper hydration it needs.

Watering

As for watering, try to keep to a schedule or habit. Placing your plant in an area you go by often will help you remember to water it. For example, on a window sill next to your coffee pot. Otherwise, try to put it on you daily schedule or planner. Remember, different plants require different amounts of water and sunlight. If you don’t already know the appropriate requirements of your plant, do a little research. Aim for the soil to be somewhat dry to the touch before watering it again.

Sunlight

Of course sunlight is an important part of ensure your plant is getting the nutrients and care it needs, so you’ll need to pick a place in the house that gets the best rays. Each plant is different and will come with sunlight recommendations for full sun, partial sun or shade.

If you’re not sure where to get the sun you need, get out your compass and check your windows. Straight sun from the south is full sun. You’re next best option for full sunlight would be sun from the west. Northern and western sun are better for partial and shade lighting.

Proper Drainage

If you have the watering mastered but your plant is still struggling, maybe the problem is how the plant drains. Only using the holes at the bottom of your pot won’t cut it! Other elements like rocks must be added. This mimics outdoor life and allows better drainage for roots.

Keep Plants Safe

Avoid injuring your plants. Indoor plants may not have to deal with outside factors, but they have other unique problems. For example, animals like cats that may want to nibble on your plant’s leaves. Some plants may also be harmful to animals.

In addition, it’s important to not change the location of your plants if you can help it. Plants do not often get up and move in nature, and they are very sensitive to change indoors. Aim to put your plant in a safe place and keep it there.

 

Great Indoor Plants

Now, if you’re in the market for a new plant to add to your indoor garden, here are a few to consider:

Geraniums: They can flower all year and come in a variety of colors. They need bright light and grow a couple feet tall or wide.

Cactus: Cactuses can be a fool proof plant, especially when it comes to watering. You can forget to water this plant without much of a problem—it’s a cactus afterall!

Palms: Palms like the ponytail palm can grow several feet tall over time, so it is a good long time houseplant if you take proper care of it. The base stores a lot of moisture which makes it a pretty durable plant for a busy person.

Succulents: Succulents can be a cute addition to your home, and they can grow over the years as well. They don’t require much care, just some bright light. If you want something a bit more colorful, check out the desert rose succulent. It has gorgeous flowers in the spring.

Aloe: Aloe is a favorite because it is so gives so much, but takes only in return. Have a burn or some dry skin? This plant can help! It’s a fantastic source for a little organic skin care, and it’s spiky spines are pretty, too.

Cast-Iron Plant: The cast-iron plant is one of the most durable plants. It only needs low levels of light and water. The leaves come in some beautiful dark green and white variations making it a solid edition to any room.

See, indoor plants aren’t that tough. Keep your plants healthy and you’ll have a beautiful signs of spring all winter—and all year—long!

(Photo Credit: https://www.mrkate.com/dear_mr_kate/what-are-the-easiest-indoor-plants/)

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